Monasterial Commission

Eighty-seven year old stained glass artist, Gerhard Richter, has obtained a  commission to design three stained glass windows at the oldest monastery in Germany. Benedictine Tholey Abbey’s windows will be designed with inspiration from Marc Chagall’s designs which are installed in France’s Metz Cathedral. A documentary film was produced about the work of this artist and you can read more about it here. 

Richter will “use the stained glass as an opportunity to create a visual manifestation of musical compositions by longtime friend and collaborator Arvo Pärt, an Estonian composer”, according to Deutsche Presse-Agentur. It will be the only non-figurative themed windows in the monastery.

For more information about this artist and his commission at the monastery, please visit this link.

 

Glass with a Past

“There is no investment you can make which will pay you so well as the effort to scatter sunshine and good cheer through your establishment.” ~ Orison Swett Marden

From simple design to gothic designs preservation of historic stained glass windows is important because its part of the cultural heritage of our country. Artisans study stained glass design in old buildings and churches to understand the past and to create for the future.

In order to fully appreciate the beauty of stained glass windows, regular cleaning is recommended so the rays can shine through the brilliant colors We’ve had some inquiries about how to clean old stained glass windows, particularly in churches. Depending on the condition and the size of the project, some old windows can be cleaned without the help of a professional and others may need a stained glass conservator to tackle the problem. Often times the kinds of deposits which have built up on the glass and the age of the window will be a factor in how to best clean the windows. Before moving forward, seek professional advice.

This article is a good one which will help you to determine which option may be best.

 

The Unveiling

MZ Glassworks looks forward to unveiling our latest lampshade design in the future. It’s nearly  finished and we’ll post photos soon. It’s been time consuming, yet fun, seeing it all come together.

Meanwhile, In Salt Lake City Utah this week the United Nations will meet for the 68th time to host The Civil Society Conference. It will be the first time the United Nations has hosted the conference away from their headquarters in New York City.

This week three stained glass panels entitled faith, love and unity will be unveiled. The opening display will be witnessed by representatives from 130 U.N. member countries. Tom Holdman of Holdman Studios, a Utah stained glass artist of international acclaim, is in the process of creating a total of seven panels. Each glass window is based on a value known to bring coalescence to humanity in different countries. The other four glass panels will represent freedom, courage, creativity, knowledge.

Learn more about The Roots of Humanity Exhibit. The colorful stained glass is a metaphoric representation of all the colorful people whose leaders represent them at the U.N.

(Photo below: three panels created by Holdman Studios for The Roots of Humanity Exhibit.)

“You can’t have unity without diversity.” ~ Richard Twiss, Native American educator

 

Honors for the Shattered

This blog post is not about flags made of polyester or nylon. I promise you it is not! So read on and learn something about a flag made from a different kind of fabric! It always feels good to show off the red, white and blue no matter what medium its made from.

Did you know? The largest stained glass flag in the world is right here in America. So, today, let’s put political preferences aside and enjoy this image, posted for all who are patriotic and proud to be an American.

This stained glass installation hangs in a public place named after one of America’s wounded warriors, which seems appropriate given the fact that the ancient poet of love, Rumi once said,  “The wound is the place where the light enters you.”

Want to know what city this glass installment hangs in? In Lawrence, Kansas at the Dole Institute of Politics.

Want to know another interesting fact? It’s bookends are two steel “I” beams from the World Trade Center.
Today I feel gratitude for Bob Dole
and all the other wounded warriors and civil servants (past and present)
who have so honorably served our country.